Conservative Party Convention Policies: Top 5 and ones that Need to Die

In less than a month, Conservatives from around Canada will be headed to Halifax to vote on policy. 

We have compiled a list of policies being presented that we think deserve your attention. 

Here are the policies that made our top 5, and those we think need to die.

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Bernier is right, supply management needs to go

For the most part, Canada is a country with an admirable degree of economic freedom. We have free trade agreements with over 40 countries (well, maybe not for long with NAFTA), established protection of property rights (in the Canadian Bill of Rights), and an open, competitive market. But there’s one area where Canada doesn’t live up to its high standards of personal and economic liberty: hiding in our agricultural industry is a Soviet-style, protectionist racket from a bygone era. Welcome to supply management, circa 2018.

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Support Equality

Contrary to the belief of some, we believe that liberty and equality  go hand in hand. Equality of opportunity is an integral part of maintaining individual liberties for all Canadians.

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The B Word

In today’s Conservative Party, being known as someone who supported Maxime Bernier in the leadership race is akin to wearing a scarlet letter. Strangely, it seems to be driven solely from the fact that he barely lost.

 

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Simplify the Income Tax Act

We propose the Conservative Party of Canada adopt supporting a simplified and flatter tax plan for Canadians.

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Tax Facts

Prepare to dislike taxation even more than you already do...

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On Marijuana Legalization, Let's Not Repeat Prohibition Mistakes

Marijuana legalization was one of Justin Trudeau’s flagship policies after becoming leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in 2013. Going into the 2015 election it became one of the Liberal Party’s policy planks, and it’s easy to see why. Public opinion on marijuana use has changed drastically over the last few decades.

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Forget NAFTA, Canada needs a Free Trade Agreement with itself

When it comes to the production and sale of many goods, Canada is more of an archipelago of provincially-protected cartels than it is a free market. At least, that is how the norms of commerce within our borders have played out for decades. The arbitrary nature of laws that govern how much booze we can haul across provincial lines, for instance, are absurd. The days of provincial protectionism may be ending though, as possibly unconstitutional laws receive some well-deserved scrutiny. Thanks to Gerard Comeau, a citizen who decided to drive to Quebec from New Brunswick to take advantage of the lower liquor prices (1), Canadians have finally seen how nonsensical the implementation of these laws really is. So monumental is this seemingly simple event that it is going all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. The binding decision will permanently affect the future of inter-provincial trade.

 

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Stop Playing Politics on Our Dime: Part 2

Part 1 of this series asked: What public good is derived from our investment in political parties with public funds? Missing from that discussion is a discussion on how the existing rules for election expense refunds have a negative impact on our democratic health. The way parties qualify for generous handouts of public funds creates an insurmountable barrier for smaller parties, and rigs the scale towards established ones.

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Stop Playing Politics on Our Dime: Part 1

It is commonly thought that political parties in Canada are entirely self-funded through voluntary donations. After the per-vote subsidy was removed in 2011, taxpayers were off the hook, right? Wrong. A myriad of tax credits and refunds still exist that keep political parties dependant on public financing for the majority of their operations.

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